Rise in Counterfeit Auto Parts Cause Safety Concerns

When consumers have their vehicles repaired at auto body shops they expect to receive OEM Parts (Original Equipment Manufacturer) car parts or at the very least quality Aftermarket parts. According to Bruce Foucart, director of the National Intellectual Property Rights Coordination Center for Homeland Security Investigations report that counterfeit auto parts are on the rise with 85-95% of all counterfeit goods coming from China.  "We’ve seen counterfeit safety belts that weren’t secure and air bags that have exploded so dramatically they probably would have done harm had they gone off.  Some of them even failed to deploy."  

Counterfeiting auto parts is a global issue that proposes health and safety concerns for consumers.  Bruce Foucart urges auto body shops to protect consumers by being certain that their parts are legitimate and checking that it is a reputable distributor and confirmed with the manufacturer.  An unusually cheap part may be a warning sign to a body shop or consumers that may look for parts on their own.  

To combat the problem is a newly formed coalition:  The Automobile Anti-Counterfeiting Coalition—the A2C2. It’s made up of nearly every automobile manufacturer and they meet four times a year.   To discover more about this coalition from Bruce Foucart, director of the National Intellectual Property Rights Coordination Center for Homeland Security Investigations click here to read the entire article written by Stacey Phillips at autobodynews.com

Many car manufactures are passionate in the pursuit to thwart those that put lives in danger through their counterfeiting activities. February of this year Hyundai launched a campaign warning Americans about counterfeit parts and the hazards that they can cause to all of us on the roadways. This Youtube video showcases a roulette wheel showing that it is a gamble not to double check the authenticity of auto parts in this day and age of difficult to detect counterfeit parts.  

The U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) estimates that counterfeit automobile parts cost the global automotive parts industry $12 billion in lost sales a year, including $3 billion in the U.S. alone. The FTC also estimates that the U.S. auto parts industry lost sales to counterfeit parts correlates to approximately 200,000 - 250,000 fewer manufacturing jobs. (Prnewswire.com)

With coalitions being formed to combat counterfeiters and an informed public working together we can authenticate our parts, and essentially maintain greater vehicle safety moving forward.